Monthly Archives: January 2015

Well, I did it…

I gave a reading of ‘Calon Lân’ at my maternal grandmother’s funeral service in Somerset. As one of her sisters had died just before Christmas, and both her (Welsh-speaking) daughters are teachers who didn’t feel they could take more time off work, I was the only person attending my grandmother’s service who felt confident and comfortable enough to give a reading in Welsh. The English translation of ‘Calon Lân’ is ‘Pure Heart’ and the Welsh and English words are posted below:

Nid wy’n gofyn bywyd moethus,
Aur y byd na’i berlau mân:
Gofyn wyf am galon hapus,
Calon onest, calon lân.Calon lân yn llawn daioni,
Tecach yw na’r lili dlos:
Dim ond calon lân all ganu
Canu’r dydd a chanu’r nos.

Pe dymunwn olud bydol,
Hedyn buan ganddo sydd;
Golud calon lân, rinweddol,
Yn dwyn bythol elw fydd.

Chorus

Hwyr a bore fy nymuniad
Gwyd i’r nef ar adain cân
Ar i Dduw, er mwyn fy Ngheidwad,
Roddi i mi galon lân.

Chorus

I don’t ask for a luxurious life,
the world’s gold or its fine pearls,
I ask for a happy heart,
an honest heart, a pure heart.A pure heart full of goodness
Is fairer than the pretty lily,
None but a pure heart can sing,
Sing in the day and sing in the night.

If I wished for worldly wealth,
It would swiftly go to seed;
The riches of a virtuous, pure heart
Will bear eternal profit.

Chorus

Evening and morning, my wish
Rising to heaven on the wing of song
For God, for the sake of my Saviour,
To give me a pure heart.

Chorus

I am to be published!

I have been putting off sending in my “Skeleton in the Cupboard” story for months if not years now, but finally got around to sending it off to Your Family Tree this afternoon, having been sent home without work again. I was amazed to receive the following as feedback very quickly:

Thank you so much for this, it’s great! It fits perfectly with the tone and you’ve got the style bang on as well! Thank you! Is it ok if we publish it this issue? We’d just need a picture of yourself and a short 20 word biography. Would this be ok?

I am beyond excited! Could this be the beginning of my journey into professional genealogy?

Worksop, Nottinghamshire

Worksop is the largest town in the Bassetlaw district of Nottinghamshire, England, on the River Ryton at the northern edge of Sherwood Forest. It is about 19 miles (31 km) east-south-east of the City of Sheffield and its population is estimated (Mid 2012) to be 44,970. Worksop is included in the Sheffield City Region of England. It is also twinned with the German town Garbsen. Worksop is attracting an increasing quantity of commuters to the local area because of its close proximity of Nottingham, Lincoln and Sheffield.

Worksop is known as the “Gateway to the Dukeries”, because of the now four obsolete ducal principle sites of which were closely located next to each other, south of the town. These four ducal locations were; Clumber House, Thoresby Hall, Welbeck Abbey and Worksop Manor.

Hoyland, Yorkshire

Hoyland is a town near Barnsley in Northern England. The town developed from the hamlets of Upper Hoyland, Hoyland, and Hoyland Common.

The town has also been known as Nether Hoyland. That name was given to it to prevent confusion with High Hoyland. When the urban district council was formed the name they used was Hoyland Nether Urban District Council. This was also applied to the area run by Hoyland UDC. However, most locals have always known it simply as Hoyland.

Hoyland is part of the metropolitan borough of Barnsley in the metropolitan county of South Yorkshire, but it lies within the historic boundaries of West Riding of Yorkshire. In 2001 it had a population of 15,497.

William THOMAS

William was one of my great-grandfathers. He was born in about 1882 in Neath, Glamorgan, the eldest son of John and Elizabeth Ann (née Edwards). I was able to discover William’s mother’s maiden name through the purchase of his brother Morgan Arthur’s birth certificate.

In 1891, John, Elizabeth, the 9 year old William and Morgan Arthur (aged 3) were living in Neath at 18 Tonna Road.

Ten years later, John had died, but Elizabeth, William and Morgan were still living together in Neath at 32 St Ann’s Terrace.

William married Miriam Jones in 1912. After John’s death, Elizabeth married John Jenkins, and died in 1925.